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Running for the board of the Open Source Initiative – a few words

Well, it has been a while I have posted anything on this blog, a little bit over a hear to be precise. I intend to post more in 2018 but I will likely not keep a regular schedule.
Today I would like to explain my reasons for my candidacy at the board of the Open Source Initiative. I can think of two kinds of reason for my decision: one is personal, and the other one is directly related to current state of Open Source and software freedom. Let’s start with the first one: I’m currently helping the Open Information Security Foundation and the Suricata project in my capacity at ANSSI, while contributing in a minor way to the LibreOffice project and the Document Foundation.
I’m also helping an exciting blockchain project called NotaryTrade, which relies both on Free & Open Source Software and Open Hardware. These are my “major” involvements at the time, and what this means is that I’m no longer focused on one community and one project like I was several years ago. The way I work and contribute, while remaining the same in many ways, has changed. What is different as well is my vantage point on the  policies affecting software freedom and I believe I could be useful to one of the most important entities in the field, the Open Source Initiative. This brings me to my second reason:

Free/Open Source Software has won. That’s not exactly new. What has NOT won however is the Free/Open Source Software as a set of principles and ideas. The entire industry is happy to reuse Open Source components but reluctant to admit they’re integrating these same components in their solutions. There’s a large part of the IT industry that does not hire contributors to Open Source projects in their capacity as Open Source projects practitioners. Yet it will gladly reuse components licensed under an OSI-approved license. In other words, a large part of the IT industry handles Open Source Software as an externality it does not have to pay for, yet relies upon for the solutions it sells and distributes.

Another worrying trend is an increase in attacks on the basic legal aspects of Open Source Software (and Open Standards as well): public policy initiatives as well as industry-wide moves aim at weakening the intellectual property tenets of Open Source and we must ensure that these trends be halted and the wider industry educated on Open Source and open standards.

The Open Source Initiative is currently in the right position to improve the standing of Open Source in the industry and defend its principles and licenses against damaging policy projects. I would like to help the OSI tackle these challenges to the best of my abilities.

You can find a short bio and a few key “agenda items” on the my candidate page and I’m of course happy to address or answer any comment posted there or here on this blog. I would also like to specially thank the Open Information Security Foundation(OISF) for its support of my candidacy. If you don’t know what the OISF does visit the Suricata project and you will discover how Open Source plays a major role in cybersecurity. Last but not least, I’m asking for your support and I hope you will help strengthen the OSI board with your vote.

Categories: Blogs

Voice and Command Line User Interfaces

Dan Bricklin's Log - Sun, 2018-01-28 20:42
I have been seeing the increasing popularity of voice-controlled "smart speakers" like the Amazon Alexa series, including heavy use among many of my close relatives and even their very young children. Attending a Gartner conference, I watched analyst Jason Wong gave a presentation about "voice first" apps, showing an example from Rhino Fleet Tracking and explaining Amazon's recently announced "Alexa for Business" offering. This was something that could be used for internal business applications, not just for personal home use. Hmm. Internal business use if my area of interest as CTO at Alpha Software.

By the time I reached the airport for the ride home, I had checked out some of the Alexa documentation and saw that it would be pretty easy to hook up Alexa to query a database to explore this area. After a little work back home, I found that connecting to the REST API of our new Alpha TransForm mobile forms data capture system would be even easier. I soon had a demo and made a short minute and a half video "Simple business app with Alexa":

Video on YouTube

I then got to discuss the video with a variety of analysts and others and think about this area a lot. One thing I was struck with was the similarities between the Alexa-style voice input and traditional Command Line Interfaces (CLI). CLI, first popularized in the computer world back in the 1960's or so and continuing today in Linux, Windows, etc., has always appealed to many professional developers despite the advent of GUI and touch-based interfaces. There is something special there. Perhaps voice and CLI share some attributes that would explain the rapid rise of its popularity in smart speakers. I decided to write an essay exploring this.

The essay I came up with is "Revenge of the CLI: A transformation through voice and AI". It's in the Writings section.
Categories: Blogs

Open Source Stacks: Jumping the Shark or Poised for Dominance?

Courtesy NewOrca/Wikimedia Commons - Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.By any measure, the rise of open source software as an alternative to the old proprietary ways has been remarkable. Today, there are tens of millions of libraries hosted at GitHub alone, and the number of major projects is growing rapidly. As of this writing the Apache Software Foundation hosts over 300 projects

Categories: Blogs

Supreme Court Curtails Patent Case "Forum Shopping"

Courtesy Library of CongressThe Supreme Court issued an opinion today that restricts the ability of patent owners to choose the court in which they bring an infringement suit. The case is called TC Heartland LLC v. Kraft Food Group Banks LLC, and the justices unanimously ruled in favor of the new restrictions.

Categories: Blogs

Guest Post: This is France's Moment (Nora Updegrove)

Courtesy Wikimedia Commons/TM - Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.Several months ago, I called on France to learn from America’s mistakes. I told the French that it wasn’t too late to save themselves. They still had a chance to do what we could not – to vote a xenophobic, nationalist candidate out of the race and away from the presidency (though, in their case, Donald Trump is replaced by Marine Le Pen, leader of the far right party, le Front national). I warned them of the complacency felt by so many Amer...

Categories: Blogs

Google Announces Android “PAX” Cross-License Program – But to What Purpose?

PaxTux, courtesy of ne~commonswiki /Wikimedia Commons - GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any laterOn Monday, Google announced a new program intended to create an expanding umbrella of protection over its Android operating system and

Categories: Blogs

Monday Witness: It's Time to Reconize a Civil Right Not to be Connected

Courtesy of PFNicholls/Wikimedia Commons -  Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.Along with death and taxes, two things appear inevitable. The first is that wireless connectivity will not only be built into everything we can imagine, but into everything we can't as well. The second is that those devices will have wholly inadequate security, if they have any security at all. Even with strong defenses, there is the likelihood that governmental agencies will gain covert access to IoT devices anyway.

What this says to...

Categories: Blogs

Monthly disclaimer

The postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent my employer’s positions, strategies or opinions. Blog entries before 2010 are in my Archived Blog. © Robert S. Sutor for Bob Sutor, 2015. All rights reserved. Permalink | No comments Categorized under: Disclaimer. Tagged with: . Twitter: bob_sutor

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Categories: Blogs

What I’m Reading on 12/29/2014

WordPress WordPress › P3 (Plugin Performance Profiler) « WordPress Plugins “This plugin creates a profile of your WordPress site’s plugins’ performance by measuring their impact on your site’s load time.  Often times, WordPress sites load slowly because of poorly configured plugins or because there are so many of them. By using…

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Categories: Blogs

Mentoring advice for a new year: 10 + 1 ideas

At some point in your life you go from being a person who is mentored to one who also is a mentor to others. I’ve had many corporate roles, so I’m usually not at a loss to have at least something to suggest to a younger colleague. Here are some…

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Categories: Blogs

What I’m Reading on 12/26/2014

An Apple developer’s perspective of the highlights in 2014 – TechRepublic “2014 was an all-star year for Apple and developers of iOS and Mac software. Here’s a look at the big Apple technologies that were released this year and how developers have been using them. “ tags: bs apple developer…

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What I’m Reading on 12/17/2014

IBM cooks up food for thought | TechCentral “Watson, the technology company’s cognitive showpiece, is bringing artificial intelligence into the kitchen by conjuring up recipes.” tags: bs ibm food watson Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here. © Robert S. Sutor for Bob Sutor, 2014. All…

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Categories: Blogs

What I’m Reading on 12/16/2014

The fall of GPL and the rise of permissive open-source licenses | ZDNet “Instead, “The three primary permissive license choices (Apache/BSD/MIT) … collectively are employed by 42 percent. They represent, in fact, three of the five most popular licenses in use today.” These permissive licenses has been gaining ground at…

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What I’m Reading on 12/11/2014

Apple and IBM partnership bears first fruit: 10 enterprise apps “The companies, which partnered up earlier this year, unveiled what they’re calling IBM MobileFirst for iOS solutions. In other words, enterprise-class apps that work on iPhones and iPads.” tags: bs apple ibm mobile apps Posted from Diigo. The rest of…

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What I’m Reading on 12/10/2014

Introducing a New Generation of Mobile Apps for the Enterprise « A Smarter Planet Blog A Smarter Planet Blog “Today, we’re delivering on that promise by announcing the first 10 mobile apps that will come to market–the first of many that we have on the drawing boards. I’m impressed by…

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What I’m Reading on 12/09/2014

R, Swift soar in language search popularity in 2014 | InfoWorld “Stalwarts like Java, PHP, and C++ remain highly popular but are dropping in Tiobe’s year-end ratings” tags: bs swift r USDA Announces 2015 Agricultural Outlook Forum Speakers, Theme “Smart Agriculture in the 21st Century” | USDA Newsroom “The plenary…

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What I’m Reading on 12/07/2014

App aims to hook anglers with big data | Business Times | BDlive “THE sport of fishing may be about to experience its biggest revolution since the 1920s, thanks to an app developed by a Swedish start-up.” tags: bs app fishing big data Posted from Diigo. The rest of my…

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What I’m Reading on 12/05/2014

My Computer Language is Better than Yours — Backchannel — Medium “The new languages give programmers some helpful legs up, to be sure. Google’s Go is structured to simplify the work of making code run “concurrently,” smoothing the way for programmers to create and juggle portions of a program that…

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What I’m Reading on 12/02/2014

Use the “22 Colors of Maximum Contrast” to Organize Your Calendars “Color-coded calendars are a great way to organize your life, but after the first few colors, it can be hard to tell them all apart. This chart, which showcases Kenneth L. Kelly’s 22 colors of maximum contrast, provides a…

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What I’m Reading on 12/02/2014

Use the “22 Colors of Maximum Contrast” to Organize Your Calendars “Color-coded calendars are a great way to organize your life, but after the first few colors, it can be hard to tell them all apart. This chart, which showcases Kenneth L. Kelly’s 22 colors of maximum contrast, provides a…

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